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colleges and universities



  • Are Endowments Damaging Colleges and Universities?

    Trends in university endowment management include investing in exotic, illiquid, and difficult-to-value assets. This would have been unthinkable to endowment managers decades ago. Does it accomplish anything besides funnelling fees to financial consultants?



  • Open Season on the Faculty

    Despite evidence that liberal indoctrination in classrooms is rare, state legislatures are proceeding with bills that would restrict professors' freedom to teach some subjects and in the case of Iowa to survey the political affiliations of faculty at state institutions. 



  • We Were the Last of the Nice Negro Girls

    by Anna Deavere Smith

    The playwright and performance artist Anna Deavere Smith recalls her educational experiences at a small historically white college during the Civil Rights era, and the way the campus climate spurred her fellow Black students to develop a distinct identity. 


  • Who Can Claim to be the United States’ First University?

    by Tom McSweeney, Katharine Ello and Elsbeth O'Brien

    New documentary evidence shows that the College of William and Mary was chartered as a university in 1693, making it the first university in the colonies. The story reflects how the sectarian strife of England in the seventeenth century helped Anglican W&M and harmed Puritan Harvard. 



  • A Fraught Balancing Act

    Questions of free speech and incitement, plus the demonstrable falsity of many claims made by pro-Trump student activist groups, makes for complicated choices for university administrators who may decide on disciplinary actions against students believed to incite violence. 



  • College Cuts in the Green Mountain State

    by Dan Chiasson

    "Data-driven" decisions to cut programs in the humanities are based in unstated assumptions of value that point to a troubling direction in higher education. 



  • ‘Never Waste a Good Pandemic’

    "Robert J. Ferry, associate professor of history and chair of Boulder’s Faculty Assembly, said that he hadn’t been involved in any discussions about the proposal thus far but that future consideration 'needs to have full involvement of the faculty'."



  • Hit by COVID-19, Colleges Do the Unthinkable and Cut Tenure

    College administrators have invoked financial exigency to make radical revisions to the tenure protections enjoyed by faculty and diminish the faculty role in campus governance. The American Association of University Professors calls it a crisis.


  • What Does African American Studies Need to Thrive?

    A recent eruption of dissention in UCLA's African American Studies department arguably reflects the strains caused by poor institutional support by the university, an issue faced by Black Studies departments on many campuses.



  • The Outrage Peddlers Are Here to Stay

    Campus Reform seeks to "stoke outrage at ‘liberal’ professors, with the political intent of creating a viral sensation that circulates through a highly partisan right-wing media ecosystem, and into the broader public discussion,” says Isaac Camola, a political science professor who has been active in organizing professors who are targeted by outrage campaigns.



  • Public Colleges and Universities Need Federal Relief

    by F. King Alexander

    Without additional stimulus, further state disinvestment is imminent, significantly limiting accessible and affordable educational opportunities for students across America.