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slavery


  • Historical Memory and the Slave Narrative Collection

    by Sarah Whitwell

    Rather than viewing memory as a passive process of recalling lived experiences as objective truths, historians have begun to view memory as an active ordering of the past.


  • Re-Animating the 1619 Project: Teachable Moments Not Turf Wars

    by James Brewer Stewart

    Those of us who value the 1619 Project can reclaim our “teachable moment” by excavating beneath the heated rhetoric. There we will discover that the journalists and the historians embrace conflicting but equally valuable historical truths regarding slavery’s power to shape our nations past and present.



  • 1619 and All That

    by Alex Lichtenstein

    "What is odd about the letter is that it implies that the singular problem with the 1619 Project is that journalists are practicing history without a license."


  • 1,056 Feet: Why I Needed the 1619 Project Growing Up

    by Derek Litvak

    The 1619 Project is not interested in retelling America’s founding story. It seeks to forge a new one. The people who contributed to this effort know full well those like myself, who grew up in the drainage ditches of America, in the long shadow of a bright star, need to hear this history. Demands to “stick to the facts” often sideline or silence our story. 



  • California’s forgotten slave history

    by Sarah Barringer Gordon and Kevin Waite

    San Bernardino’s early success rested on a pair of seemingly incongruous forces: Mormonism and slavery.



  • A Matter of Facts

    by Sean Wilentz

    The New York Times’ 1619 Project launched with the best of intentions, but has been undermined by some of its claims.



  • How One Man's Story Offers a New Way to Understand Slave Insurrection

    by Vincent Brown

    Wager, also known by his African name, Apongo, was a leader of the largest slave rebellion in the 18th century British Empire. But long before taking his part in the great Jamaican insurrection of 1760– 1761, commonly called Tacky’s Revolt, he had been on a remarkable odyssey.



  • 1619?

    by Sasha Turner

    What to the historian is 1619?



  • The Fight Over the 1619 Project Is Not About the Facts

    by Adam Serwer

    A dispute between a small group of scholars and the authors of The New York Times Magazine’s issue on slavery represents a fundamental disagreement over the trajectory of American society.



  • The Slaves Dread New Year's Day the Worst': The Grim History of January 1

    In the African-American community, New Year’s Day used to be widely known as “Hiring Day” — or “Heartbreak Day,” as the African-American abolitionist journalist William Cooper Nell described it — because enslaved people spent New Year’s Eve waiting, wondering if their owners were going to rent them out to someone else, thus potentially splitting up their families.