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journalism


  • The Pentagon is Missing the Big Picture on "Stars and Stripes"

    by Mark T. Hauser

    The Pentagon's plan to scrap funding for the Stars and Stripes newspaper isn't just an attack on a historic military institution. It's ignoring the lessons the paper's history offers for efficient operation and integrating military operations with the economic life of the nation. 



  • How Latinos Can Win the Culture War

    by Elizabeth Méndez Berry and Mónica Ramírez

    Latino/a Americans can secure their place in America against racist and nativist attacks by demanding representation in the news and entertainment media. The media have been important sources of power in the past, but are still not representative of American demographics. 



  • Sunday Reading: Hiroshima

    Read John Hersey's influential 1946 account of the atomic bomb and its aftermath, along with related articles from The New Yorker. 



  • Why "White" Should be Capitalized, Too

    by Nell Irvin Painter

    A capitalized “White” challenges that freedom, by unmasking “Whiteness” as an American racial identity as historically important as “Blackness” — which it certainly is.


  • Barry Zorthian's War: The Pentagon and the Press in Vietnam

    by Ron Steinman

    A 1970 speech by Barry Zorthian, the Pentagon's chief public information officer in Vietnam, shows a thoughtful approach to balancing the rights of journalists with the need of the military to control information. That approach is missing in the era of "fake news" and open hostility by the administration for the press.



  • Letters From An American: June 8, 2020

    by Heather Cox Richardson

    Among other topics, Professor Richardson weighs in on the New York Times editorial fiasco, arguing that Tom Cotton's op ed was too detached from fact to make any contribution to meaningful public debate. 



  • Ida Taught Me

    by Koritha Mitchell

    As the United States seems determined to repeat the horrors of the last turn of the century, I remain grateful for Wells’s example. Here is just some of what she taught me.



  • The Country has been Through a Draining, News-Packed April Before

    by Christopher B. Daly

    By the end of April 1945, the institutions of American journalism generally met the challenges of an overwhelming torrent of news and helped other American institutions manage military, political and economic transition.



  • Ida B. Wells Honored with Posthumous Pulitzer

    Ida B. Wells's pioneering role as a journalist on the front lines of struggle against racist terrorism at the nadir of American race relations was posthumously recognized with a Pulitzer Prize yesterday. 

  • The Truth about the Five O’ Clock Follies

    by Ron Steinman

    Ron Steinman covered the notorious "Five O'Clock Follies" press conferences held by American military leadership in Saigon, and warns against comparing them to the Trump administration's daily Coronavirus briefings.