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historiography



  • Continuing to Reshape Women’s History: The Ongoing Story of Nontraditional Women Historians

    by Julie Gallagher and Barbara Winslow

    The editors of a collection of essays by non-traditional women historians celebrate the impact of the Catherine Prelinger Award (of the Coordinating Council for Women in History), which aided the scholarship published in their book and is supporting a new generation of women historians expanding the scope of the field to address race, disability, indigeneity, and mass incarceration (among other issues).



  • Baseball History and Rural America

    The study of how baseball evolved, historain David Vaught writes, remains a test of how history is written--from concern with origin moments or attention to ongoing processes of change and development.



  • The Pandemic Has Led to an Outbreak of Terrible Historical Analogies

    The pandemic has given Americans lots to think about, not the least of which are the awful historical analogies and references used to make its worst actors seem valorous. Here are some of the most egregious examples, why they’re absurd, and why they should be taken seriously.



  • What Was Saved

    Sarah Broom's memoir "The Yellow House" reconstructs not only her family’s history in New Orleans but also that larger arc of the black experience in the United States.



  • Neglected Gems of Urban History

    by Richard Harris

    For two generations, Lampard told urban historians that cities mattered especially, but not only, in economic terms.



  • The Birth, Death, and Rebirth of Postmodernism

    Moira Weigel, Justin E.H. Smith, Mark Greif, Ethan Kleinberg, Marjorie Perloff, Jessica Burstein, Seo-Young Chu, David Bromwich, Anna Kornbluh, and Steven Weinberg reflect on the past, present, and future of postmodernism. 


  • Herodotus Lives!

    by Jeremy D. Popkin

    A bracing defense of historiography and why it’s relevant.