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teaching history



  • Just for Fun, Games Historians Play

    by Randall Ballmer

    Counterfactual scenarios have a tremendous allure for historians at idle times, as does speculating about what historians will remember about the present. A noted historian of American religion has some thoughts on both topics. 



  • Epic Lego Battles Are A Smash On YouTube

    A subculture of Lego and military history enthusiasts has achieved notoriety for posting stop-motion videos of historic battles, despite the official non-violence policy of the building toy company. 



  • Remote Teaching Wiki

    Here, historians who have resources useful for remote teaching can share them, and those racing to adapt courses can search for materials instead of working from scratch. 



  • More Than a Month: The Push to Change how Black History is Taught

    “Educators need to educate themselves,” educator Rann Miller says. “Quite frankly, you have a lot of white people who are unaware of the history of our nation. You may also have a lot of Black people who are unaware of the history of our nation.”



  • US History: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

    John Oliver takes a look at how the history of race in America is taught in schools, how we can make those teachings more accurate, and why it’s in everyone's best interest to understand the most realistic version of the past.



  • Remote Reflections: One Class, 55 Classrooms

    by John Hopper

    I was pleased that the transition to entirely remote learning went well. However, there are definite drawbacks to this kind of teaching, even for someone who is used to teaching students in multiple locations. 



  • Arkansas History Books Carried Rebel Slant

    Arkansas historians Kenneth Barnes and Carl H. Moneyhon discuss the political influence of Confederate sympathizers and white supremacy over the content of history books in the state. 



  • “A Keen Vision and Feeling of All Ordinary Life”: Pandemic Journaling in the History Classroom

    by Michelle Orihel

    Since memory is essential to functioning in our daily lives, we all think historically to survive, even if only to question ourselves: “Did I pay that bill yesterday?” In answering that question, we reconstruct yesterday’s actions in our minds and perhaps even search for physical (or in today’s case, digital) evidence of that task. There it is — historical thinking!